Digital Rights Management as Fast As Possible





How has DRM evolved over the years, and where do we see it going?

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35 thoughts on “Digital Rights Management as Fast As Possible

  • Think about this:
    I was using cracked Adobe(the most cracked software in the world if you ask). However, I have migrated to genuine adobe CC subscription some times ago only to find out genuine adobe only work on two devices with $20/Mo Fee(WITH student discount).
    reasonable, but ridiculous

  • The best way to have a safe and reliable DRM for games is to do a one time verification when first launched. I don't mind if it check every time it gets internet access or hardware change but please make it that it doesn't expires. If for some reason you have electricity but not internet at the moment it would be a life saver.

  • This is how I see piracy.

    I've been poor my entire life. We never had the money to buy a high grade desktop that could run games. Until recently, that's been the case. Same thing goes for buying the games themselves. So I pirated games so I could play them with the FULL intent to buy them once I got the chance and now that I have a better job, that time is coming. With my new computer I'll be able to play all the games I've pirated and thanks to GOG and Steam, it's easy to find them. Once I have the system to play them on and the cash to buy them, I will no longer pirate any game or software.

    Save for two exceptions.
    1. Games that I want to play but I don't want to support the developer because of something they've done. Battlefield 5 is a good example. I hate Dice and EA for the way they treat franchises and their customers and while I want to play their game, I don't believe they deserve my money.
    2. Demos. It's very unfortunate that many developers no longer create demos of their games so we can see if we like them before we buy them. Therefore when I find a game I like, I'll pirate it first, see if its worth my money,then, if it is, delete the pirated copy and purchase it legally.

    However, with some DRMs, it's unreasonable, like games that limit how many times you can install them. I bought, I have the right to do with it as I please.

  • DRM is as much a cancer on the video game industry as lootboxes. They both have the same source as well. Greed.
    Ironically, amazing game companies like CD Projeckt Red don't put "standard" DRM in their games, and rather let the games themselves convince the player that they are worth the purchase. Which they always are. A game that can recognize that all the PLAYER cares about is having a good time is infinitely more likely to sell copies than a DRM infested shitstink of a game that was pumped out in 5 months.

  • So if I bought my games here in the Philippines I won't be able to play them if I fly to… let's say the US, Korea, or Japan?

  • Hollywood perves on a small Australian Primary school – writes movies about them, and then charges the world to watch stories that are about naked little kids playing with thier pee pee in the bathroom.

  • Back in the early 2000s. I had bought a new computer with dvd recording. That was the draw for purchase. I had alot of cd that seen better days. I loaded my cd and it had automatically recorded to my hard drive. I then decided to make a cd copy and did just that. At the time they worried about copyrighted material and in an instant that was automatically ignored by the computer. The computer totally undermining drm. I understood fair use copy. I found out all the computers that I had access to did not protect anything at that time. Later dvd did a better job with dmr. Now you even buy copies with copies of dvd and blu-rays not for just compatibility but reduce piracy. With the new technology it is wild west with dmr. Some having great protection and many more having none.

  • i draw a big big line at the constant phone home connectivity ones

    most of my EA games are unavailable if i decide to take my computer with me

    big reason i use steam more often now

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